Past Time

Just a Minute, originally uploaded by BombDog.

Larger here.

Tag search ‘clock’. I have never seen one of these before but I can think of a few computer fanatics I know who would like them.

Here’s some blurb from an online vendor called nixieclock.net:

Nixie tubes were originally developed in 1952 by the Haydu brothers for the Burroughs Corporation as the precursor to the computer monitor. The name “Numerical Indicator experimental: NIX-i” was first a working acronym belonging to the Burroughs company but became the common name for these readouts. From the early 1950’s to the 1970’s Nixie tubes were the dominant display service. Later they were supplanted by LED displays and are quite rare today! They found their way into everything from test equipment over early computers to aerospace and submarines or the display of the New York stock exchange. While LED’s are technically more advanced, their aesthetics leave something to be desired. A Nixie’s digits consist of ten thin metal electrodes that are individually formed and can easily incorporate uneven curves and skew lines. The only technical flaw is based on the fact that the digits are stacked in front of each other; this causes tiny gaps where they are shadowed by the digits in front of it. Ironically, they were hardly used as clock displays. Over recent years their popularity has increased dramatically due to their unusual appearance and historical value. In essence they are like miniature neon signs with a warm, comforting orange/violet glow. Nixie clocks have become very popular as a way to bring these devices ‘out of the dark’.

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